A PARIS JOURNAL – A ROSE FOR MAN RAY

 

A cool, cloudy day in Paris today, a good day to visit the Cimetière du Montparnasse and pay my respects to one of the Twentieth Century’s greatest photographers, Man Ray. I spent some time researching his life this past year and wanted to lay a rose on his and Juliet’s grave. One of his studios was located on the Rue Campagne Première, just a short walk from the cemetery. For more information about Man Ray please see my posts from last year:

 

https://nitepoetry.wordpress.com/2014/07/24/the-paris-journal-xvi/

https://nitepoetry.wordpress.com/2014/07/10/unconcerned-but-not-indifferent/

 

000 Man Ray 2015 APlacing a red rose on Man and Juliet Ray’s grave in the Cimetière du Montparnasse.


000 Man Ray 2015 BMan Ray’s studio at 30-31bis on the Rue Campagne Première on the ground floor at the left of the photo.


Both photos taken in in Paris in May 2015.


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Categories: Paris, Photography | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

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2 thoughts on “A PARIS JOURNAL – A ROSE FOR MAN RAY

  1. nannus

    I did not know he was burried there. One more place to go on a Paris-visit.
    Living in Germany, I am just noticing how strange these graves are. Really a different culture of graves with these stone sarcophagi. The ones in the back of the picture resemble Roman ones (at least for my lay man’s eyes – I am thinking of the ones standing outside the Römisch-Germanisches Museum here in Cologne. So question to the expert: is this burial in stone sarcophagi connected to roman culture, or is that a later development?

    • It would seem to be a later development and not directly connected to ancient Roman culture. The similarities are interesting, but probably have more to do with people wanting to have their, paraphrasing Andy Warhol, “15 minutes” of immortality. The three largest Parisian cemeteries were all established in the 19th century. in 1804, Napoléon opened the Père-Lachaise Cemetery, Montparnasse and Montmartre soon followed, in 1824 and 1825.

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